Tuesday, October 25, 2005

Civil Rights Hero Rosa Parks dead at 92

(1913-2005)
She sat down so that an entire nation could stand up.
May her memory recommit us to the fight for the rights of all Americans.
---End of Transmission---

5 comments:

crimnos said...

I've had a feeling this was coming for quite some time, but it didn't soften the blow when it happened. I think now would probably be an appropriate time to remember all the women who were part of the civil rights struggle but never got the recognition they deserved.

james said...

Crimnos:

Agreed. It seems today that the leaders of the civil rights movements can not hold a candle to the originators.

Zen Unbound said...

I have an ambiguous reaction to Rosa Parks's death. On the one hand, she is one of the most celebrated people in history for the tiny effort she put into what she did. It this respect she is sort of like Zsa Zsa Gabor.

On the other hand, she it the indispensible catalist for the transformation of America and its ethical and spiritual growth.

Too, she is sort of like Bill Gates, a lynchpin that changed everything. BUT one supposes -- like Gates -- that if she hadn't come along, and done what she did, someone else would have been the catalist for change shortly thereafter.

-- Tom

crimnos said...

On the one hand, she is one of the most celebrated people in history for the tiny effort she put into what she did. It this respect she is sort of like Zsa Zsa Gabor.

I sort of agree with you on her act being a catalyst, though there was a lot more tension building than is generally acknowledged at the time, but er, say what? Tiny effort? Can't you put yourself in her shoes for just a second and try to imagine the courage and...well, effort it took to do what she did? I suppose you can argue that she wasn't always out on the front lines like some other folks did, but I can't go that far with you.

Zen Unbound said...

crimnos,

From what I understand, Rosa Parks' arrest was all very dignified. The officer was sorry about it, but he had to enforce the law.

Maybe it was more like Neil Armstrong [first step on the moon], heralded and remembered forever, but not of itself significant other than it was a first.

-- Tom Armstrong